10 Different Types of Dinosaurs

Let’s learn about the different dinosaur lower classifications. There are over 700 documented species of dinosaurs; but these are the most popular types of dinosaurs discovered:

Pterodactyl

Pterodactyl

Pterodactyl is the name given to many different types of dinosaurs that had wings. However, these dinosaurs belong to a group called pterosaurs of which, the pterodactly is only one species.

  • Lived: 201.3 million years ago – 136.4 million years ago (Hettangian – Valanginian)
  • Scientific name: Pterodactylus (Winged finger)
  • Extinction status: Extinct
  • Higher classification: Euctenochasmatia
  • Order: Pterosaur

Lirainosaurus

Lirainosaurus

Lirainosaurus was a dinosaur that ate plans. There have been lots of fossils of Lirainosaurus found in what we know today as Spain.

  • Scientific name: Lirainosaurus
  • Extinction status: Extinct
  • Rank: Genus
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Higher classification: Titanosauridae

Iguanodon

Iguanodon

Another dinosaur that fed on plants, Iguanodon, is believed to have been able to walk on two legs as well as on all fours. Fossil remains show that Iguanodon had large thumb spikes on its hands more than likely used to fight predators.

  • Lived: 157.3 million years ago – 93.9 million years ago (Kimmeridgian – Cenomanian)
  • Height: 8.9 ft. (Adult)
  • Mass: 8,800 – 11,000 lbs
  • Length: 33 ft. (Adult)
  • Extinction status: Extinct

Allosaurus

Allosaurus

Allosaurus was a meat-eating dinosaur and is the most common dinosaur fossil found in Utah’s Cleveland-Lloyd Quarry, a site containing the densest concentration of Jurassic dinosaur bones in the world.

Lived: 163.5 million years ago – 89.3 million years ago (Late Jurassic – Turonian)
Speed: 19 – 34 mph
Extinction status: Extinct
Eats: Stegosaurus, Brachiosaurus
Weight: two tons

Brontosaurus

Brontosaurus

Brontosaurus was a large herbivorous sauropod dinosaur. The name comes from Greek and translates to “thunder lizard”.

  • Lived: 157.3 million years ago – 145 million years ago (Kimmeridgian – Tithonian)
  • Speed: 12 – 19 mph
  • Higher classification: Apatosaurinae
  • Scientific name: Brontosaurus (Thunder lizard)
  • Family: †Diplodocidae

Gallimimus

Gallimimus

Gallimimus were fast theropod dinosaurs. Scientist believe that these types of dinosaurs moved like flightless birds (chickens).

  • Height: 6.6 ft. (At the hips, Adult)
  • Lived: 100.5 million years ago – 66 million years ago (Cenomanian – Maastrichtian)
  • Mass: 440 lbs
  • Length: 20 ft.
  • Scientific name: Gallimimus (Chicken mimic)

Isanosaurus

Isanosaurus

Isanosaurus was a dinosaur that ate plants. These dinosaurs inhabited Asia and many Isanosaurus fossils have been found in Phetchabun Province, Thailand.

  • Mass: 4,400 – 6,600 lbs
  • Lived: 228 million years ago – 201.3 million years ago (Norian – Rhaetian)
  • Length: 21 ft.
  • Rank: Genus
  • Scientific name: Isanosaurus (Isan lizard)
  • Phylum: Chordata

Mosasaurus

Mosasaurus

The Mosasaurus was a gigantic ocean-dwelling dinosaur. These dinosaurs were carnivores and ate anything that they could fit into their mouths.

  • Length: 33 – 59 ft.
  • Lived: 99.6 million years ago – 66 million years ago (Cretaceous – Paleocene)
  • Extinct in: Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event
  • Mass: 30,000 lbs
  • Extinction status: Extinct

Triceratops

Triceratops

Triceratops was a large quadrupedal plant-eating dinosaur that had a frill of bone at the back of its skull, three pointed horns, and a beak-like mouth.

  • Lived: 83.5 million years ago – 66 million years ago (Campanian – Maastrichtian)
  • Extinct in: Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event
  • Height: 9.5 – 9.8 ft.
  • Mass: 13,000 – 26,000 lbs

Tyrannosaurus Rex

Tyrannosaurus Rex

The most popular dinosaur, Tyrannosaurus Rex, lived throughout what is now western North America. These apex predators grew up to 40 feet in length and 12 feet in height. What could kill a T-Rex? Another T-Rex.

  • Height: 12 – 20 ft.
  • Lived: 83.6 million years ago – 66 million years ago (Cretaceous)
  • Extinct in: Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event

References/Further Readings:

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